Monday, July 6, 2015

Cyber Security and Business Analytics: Imperfect Together

This week, I was reading an excellent piece here about the cyclical nature if the Business Intelligence/Analytics industry (BI). The assertion here is that priority tends to swing between periods of high business-driven enablement and IT-driven governance.  The former tends to be brought on by advances in technology, and the latter by external events, regulation, and necessity.  We are currently at the apex of an enablement cycle at the expense of governance. One casualty of lax governance is often cyber security.

Recently, we have seen a rash of high-profile data breaches. One of these was the large scale theft of data from the health insurer Anthem. This one was notable as it was the result of a vulnerable data warehouse where sensitive data was left unencrypted.

Those of us who practice BI and Data Warehousing professionally have a paradox to deal with. We have always been evaluated on our ability to make more data available to more users on more devices with the least effort to support business decisions. In the process, we tend to create ‘one-stop shopping’ and slew of potential vulnerabilities to those who would access proprietary data with criminal intent.

The software vendors in our space have been all too complicit in this. After all, what sounds better to the business decision-makers they market to: “multi-factor authentication” or “dashboards across all your mobile devices”? “advanced animated visualizations” or “intrusion detection”? “data blending” or “end-end data encryption”?

How about “self-service business analytics” or “help yourself to our data”? Consider how easy we make it for the users in an enterprise to export just the useful parts of a customer database, along with summaries of transaction history to a USB stick and walk out the door with it?

This idea that BI and data warehousing requires more attention to security is starting to gain traction, however. A quick web search reveals that the academics are starting to study it and the leading established vendors in the space are starting to feature it in their marketing in ways I have not seen before. See the current headline on the MicroStrategy website for one example.

The main takeaway here is that BI and data warehousing practitioners need to consider cyber security in architectures and applications the same way it is done in transaction processing:
  •          Get a complete BI vulnerability assessment from a cyber-security professional
  •          Calculate the expected value of an incident (probability of an event times the cost to recover) and allocate budgets accordingly
  •          Demand proven security technology from your vendors and integrators around features such as authentication, end-end encryption, and selective access controls by organizational role
  •          Don’t be afraid of the cloud. The leading vendors of cloud services employ state of the art security technology out of market necessity and are often the most cost effective solution available.



1 comment:

  1. Great post!
    Leading companies today are rethinking the role of information security in their organizations. They realize that in a digital world, cybersecurity is the key to safeguarding their most precious assets-intellectual property, customer information, financial data, and employee records, among others.

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